Department of Periodontology

Our mission is the education of Periodontology and research on periodontal tissue and periodontal diseases.
The aim of our study is to identify pathogenesis of periodontal diseases and to develop unprecedented and innovative clinical strategies for destructed periodontal tissues.
We try to reveal the mechanisms of the onset and progress of periodontal diseases and wound healing / regeneration of periodontal tissues at cellular and molecular levels in diverse approaches such as in vitro cell culture system and in vivo animal models.

Staff

position
name
E-mail (below@, dent.osaka-u.ac.jp)
Professor
Shinya Murakami
ipshinya@
Associate Professor
Masahiro Kitamura
kitamura@
Associate Professor
Motozo Yamashita
yamashim@
Associate Professor
Masahide Takedachi
Assistant Professor
Jirota Kitagaki
Assistant Professor
Chiharu Fujiwara
Assistant Professor

Topics of Research

We have found a periodontal ligament specific molecule, that is named PLAP-1. We have been investigating the roles of PLAP-1 in periodontal tissue.
Recently, our project is focusing on the development of periodontal tissue regenerative therapy for lost periodontal tissue caused by the progression of severe periodontitis.
Establishment of FGF-2 (basic fibroblast growth factor) inductive periodontal tissue regeneration therapy is one of the major clinical projects that is highly evaluated as a leading-edge study in this field. Furthermore, we have been investigating transplant therapy using adipose-tissue derived stem cells.

Our current research projects are;

1. Development of periodontal regeneration therapy.
  (FGF-2 therapy, Transplantation of stem cells isolated from adipose-tissues.)

2. Comprehensive analysis of gene expression in periodontal tissue.

3. Analysis of pathogenesis in periodontal diseases using immunological approaches.

4. Analysis of the inflammatory mechanism regulated by the ATP-catalytic reaction in periodontal disease.

5. Analysis of intracellular cytokine signaling cascades in periodontal stem cells.

Our current research projects are